War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0469 Chapter XXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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to have the terrible example of the punishment to which these misguided men are sentenced is the only matter left for discussion.

Upon this question you who have suffered for the Union, who have stood by it in evil and good report; you who have leaved and are hereafter to live in this city at your homes when all are gathered again under that flag which has been here so foully outraged and to whose wrongs these men's lives are forfeited; you who I have heard have exerted your talents to save the lives of Union men in the hour of true peril, ought to have a determine weight when your opinions have been deliberately formed. You ask for these men's lives. You shall have them. You say that this clemency of the Government is best for the good of that cause we all have at heart. Be it so. You are more likely to be better informed upon this than I am. I have no wish to do anything but that which all show the men of Louisiana how great a good they were tempted to thrown away when they were led to raise their hands against the Constitution and laws of the United States.

If this example of mercy is lost upon those situated in like case swift justice can overtake others in like manner offending.

I will cause the popper order to go the provost-marshal to suspend the execution of the sentence of death upon Abraham McLane, Daniel Doyle, Edward C. Smith, Patrick Kane, George L. Williams, and William Stanley, and shall commute their punishment to hard labor on the fortifications at Ship Island, or the nearest military post, at the pleasure of the President of the United States.

I have the honor to be, your friend and servant,

BENJ. F. BULTER.

[Inclosure D.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, June 3, 1862.

Captain JONAS H. FRENCH,

Provost-Marshal, District of New Orleans:

CAPTAIN: You will suspend the execution of the sentence of death upon Abraham McLane, Daniel Doyle, Edward C. Smith, Patrick Kane, George L. Williams, and William Stanley, authorized by General Orders, No. 36, and cause them and each of them, to be confined at hard labor upon the fortifications at Ship Island, or the nearest military post, during the pleasure of the United States.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure E.]

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, No. 70.

New Orleans, June 5, 1862.

William B. Mumbord, a citizens of New Orleans, having been convicted before the military commission of treason and an overt act thereof, tearing down the United States flag from a public building of the United States, for the purpose of inciting other evil-minded persons to further resistance to the laws and arms of the United States, after said flag was placed there by Commodore Farragut, of the United States Navy:

It is ordered that he be executed according to sentence of said military commission on Saturday, June 7, inst., between the hours of 8 a.m. and 12 m. under the directions of the provost-marshal of the District of New Orleans, and for so doing this shall be his sufficient warrant.

By command of Major-General Butler, commanding department:

WM. H. WIEGEL,

First Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.