War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0456 W. FLA., S.ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXVII.

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as to elect for him the approbation and thanks of the entire command, embracing both officers and men.

Trusting that my efforts and those under my command to execute your orders will meet your approbation, I am with respect, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. KEITH,

Lieutenant Col. Twenty-first Indiana Vols., Comdg. Detachment.

A.

I hereby solemnly swear that I will not take up arms against the Confederate States (South) America, unless my property, myself, or those depending upon me should be threatened.

Houma, May 11, 1862.

JOSEPHUS MORRIS.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 11th day May, 1862.

H. NEWELL,

Clerk Third District Court, Terre Bonne.

B.

J. Morris, from the State of Indiana, having given his parole not to take up arms against the Confederate States (South) during the existing war, has permission to pass unmolested to Terre Bonne Station, on his way to New Orleans.

Houma, May 11, 1862.

H. NEWELL.

F. GAYNE.

A. S. HELMICK.

S. H. HRONESBY.

B. COOPER.

C.

PROCLAMATION.

A foul and unnatural murder of two American soldiers, repugnant alike to the instincts of humanity and the practice of civilized warfare, has caused the presence of this portion of the U. S. Army among you, for the sole purpose of bringing to justice the guilty. Although the cowardly miscreants may have fled, fearing the swift and righteous retribution with should follow the perpetration of their horrible crime, they are known to the citizens of this place. By withholding the names of the guilty parties to the crime, liable both in law and justice to suffer the penalties of the same.

As prompt, full, and free communication of the names of these wretches on the part of the citizens of Houma, with such other information as will lead to their speedy capture, can alone save the town and neighboring country from the severe punishment so justly merited. The atrocious nature of the crime itself-the indecent, shameless, and un-Christian-like burial and robbery of the dead-taken in connection, and the veil indignities offered to the mutilated bodies of the two soldiers, have forever disgrace the town of Houma, which disgrace can only be