War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0427 Chapter XXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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[Inclosure L.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, May 16, 1862.

To the Mayor and Gentleman of the City Council Of New Orleans:

In the report of your official action, published in the Bee of the 16th instant, I find the following extracted resolution, with the action of part of your body thereon, Viz:

The following preamble and resolution, offered by Mr. Smith, were read twice and adopted; the rules being suspended, were on motion sent to the assistant board.

YEAS: Mr. De Labarre, Forstall, Huckins, Rodin, and Smith - 5.

Whereas it has come to the knowledge of this council that for the first time in the history of this city a large fleet of the navy of France is about to visit New Orleans, of which fleet the Catina, now in our port, is the pioneer; this council bearing in grateful remembrance the many ties of amity and good feeling which unite the people of this city with those of France, to whose paternal protection New Orleans owes its foundation and earl prosperity, and to whom it is especially grateful for the jealously with which in the secession of the State it guaranteed all the rights of property, person, and religious freedom of its citizens: Be it

Resolved, That the freedom and hospitality of the city be tendered, through the commander of the Catina, to the French naval fleet during its sojourn in our port; and that a committee of five council be appointed, together with the mayor, to make such tender and such other arrangements as may be necessary to give effect to the same.

Messrs. Smith and Firstall wee appointed on the committee mentioned in the foregoing resolution.

This action is an insult as well to the United States as to the friendly, powerful, and progressive nation toward whose officers, it is directed. The offer of the freedom of a captured city by the captives would merit letters-patent for its novelty were there not doubts of its usefulness as an invention. The tender of its hospitalities by a government to which police duties and sanitary regulations only are instructed is simply an invitation to the calaboose or the hospital. The United States authorities are the only ones here capable of dealing with amicable or inimicable nations, and will see to it that such acts of courtesy or assistance are extended to any armed vessel of the Emperor of France as shall testify the national, traditional, and hereditary feelings of grateful remembrance with which the United States Government and people appreciate the early aid of France and her many acts of friendly regard shown upon so many national and fitting occasions.

The action of the city council in this behalf must be reversed.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure M.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, May 16, 1862.

SIR: Your communication, covering those from sundry persons claiming to have ben injured in their property by the disorderly acts of United States soldiers, has been received.

My notice had been brought to the same subject-matter.

As soon as the soldiers return by whom it is alleged the wrong was done the matter will be completely investigated and prompt justice administered.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

M. MEJAN, Consul de France.