War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0421 Chapter XXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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The operation against the forts is recommended by the probability that it is not likely they have expected an attempt of this kind.

The prevailing idea with the defenders probably has been and is to prevent the passage of vessels, not so much to defend themselves.

In this project everything depends on the success of the naval part of the plan. Can the Navy do what I assign to it? If not, with actual means can it by special preparations which will not occupy more than a couple of months?

What has been done to these works by the Confederates is not known to me, but I should think that the blockading fleet might ascertain with much certainly.

Should there appear to be anything in this memoir worthy of being acted upon I should desire its submission to the general-in-chief and to General Totten, Chief Engineer U. S. Army, whose thorough acquaintance with these works and great experience would make his counsel very desirable.

If the attack is determined upon it would be desirable, if possible, to avoid any returning preparations, but to collect the squadron and land force at once from means now available.

Respectfully submitted.

J. G. BARNARD,

Brigadier-General, and Chief Engineer Army of Potomac.

P. S.- Two sheets of drawings accompany this paper, copied from maps in the archives of the Engineer Department.*

Whenever the use ceases these and whatever copies may be taken should be returned by whomsoever possesses them to the Engineer Department.

N. B.- The operations indicated in this memoir should be preceded by a bombardment from the water vessels and 11 and 9 inch guns mainly upon Fort Jackson. It should be kept up twenty-four hours (if the work does not surrender before that time, which it is quite likely to do) without intermission.

J. G. BARNARD.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, No. 37.

New Orleans, May 13, 1862.

It appearing that the New Orleans Crescent, a newspaper published in this city, is owned and edited by J. O. Nixon, a rebel now in arms against the Government of the United States, the commanding general of this department orders tat the publication of that newspaper be suppressed, and that no publication by pamphlet, handbill, or otherwise, in any form whatever, shall be mad from said office after the promulgation of this order.

By command of Major-General Butler;

GEO. C. STRONG,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, No. 39.

[May 13, 1862.]

I. The New Orleans Bee newspaper, having published an elaborate

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* Not found.

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