War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0271 Chapter XXVII. PORT HUDSON, LA.

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PORT HUDSON, March 12, 1863.

The enemy appear to be advancing slowly on three roads. I have three days' corn and thirty days' meat.

FRANK. GARDNER,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON.

HEADQUARTERS,

Port Hudson, La., March 13, 1863.

GENERAL: I think the enemy will give up attempting to land their whole force at Springfield on account of the water. Below the point near Troth's Landing they could effect a landing out of range of my guns, but would have to march by Troth's. I therefore desire yo to place a regiment of infantry and one light battery at Troth's house on picket. The advance at this point can easily be resisted. Keep your brigade ready for any emergency to move at a moment's notice. I shall rely upon you to resist the enemy at Troth's, and I think I will merely keep them in observation at Springfield.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK. GARDNER,

Major-General.

Brigadier General ALBERT RUST, Commanding Brigade.

PORT HUDSON, March 14, 1863.

GENERAL: The steamboats have arrived with corn just in time. I shall get them all off to-night. The enemy are now bombarding this place and their land forces have advanced. Their whole fleet of eleven vessels is in sight, but nothing decided is yet shown in their operations. I shall need 17,000 bushels of corn per month for the commissary and 20,000 bushels for quartermaster; also about 1,200,000 pounds of fodder. It is impossible to obtain these supplies elsewhere than from Red River.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK. GARDNER,

Major-General.

Major General RICHARD TAYLOR,

Commanding West Louisiana, Alexandria, La.

PORT HUDSON, March 14, 1863.

The firing from the enemy is once in two or three minutes at long