War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0183 Chapter XXVII. BERWICK BAY, LA.

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The citizens of this town acted nobly, particularly Mr. Dunn and Mr. Charles Oglesbury, who remained in the town and materially assisted the commanding officer, suffering their property to be destroyed without a murmur, and only regretting they could do no more to serve their country.

The ladies of the place, among whom Mrs. Chesley and Mrs. Dunn and the two beautiful and accomplished daughters of the former bore a conspicuous part, acted the part of true Southern heroines, supplying our tired soldiers with coffee, bread, and meat even during the thickest of the fight.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE E. CONKLIN,

Lieutenant and Adjutant.

Major E. F. GRAY,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, San Antonio, Tex.

NOVEMBER 1-6, 1862.-Naval operations on Berwick Bay, La.

REPORTS.

No. 1.-Lieutenant Commander Thomas McKean Buchanan, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. steamer Calhoun.

No. 2.-Captain E. W. Fuller, commanding Confederate steamer Cotton.

No. 1. Report of Lieutenant Commander Thomas McKean Buchanan, U. S. Navy, commanding U. S. steamer Calhoun.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, November 6, 1862.

Rear-Admiral FARRAGUT,

Commanding Western Blockading Squadron:

I am pleased to return to you a copy of Lieutenant-Commander Buchanan's report of his operations at Berwick Bay. I am sorry to say that owing to the storms and delays necessary and unnecessary in moving our fleet we were not able to get there three days sooner, when we should have infallibly bagged the whole rebel party. Now, as it is, we must do the best we can.

We are proposing to go father, and may yet be employed some days upon this matter. I will keep you informed of all further operations.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

UNITED STATES STEAMER CALHOUN,

Off Brashear City, November 4, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to report that we arrived off here on the night of the 1st, but unfortunately too late to stop the rebels from crossing. We had a great deal of difficulty in getting over the bay, and felt the want of our light-draught vessels very much. The day the Kinsman

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*See also Appendix, p.1087.

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