War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0055 Chapter XXVII. VICKSBURG, MISS., AND BATON ROUGE, LA.

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have delivered themselves up as prisoners of war. I have also fully 70 wounded prisoners, that were left on the field; also about 30 captured. I would like instructions as to the disposition you wish made of them. Some of them express a wish to be paroled.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. W. CAHILL,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

Captain R. S. DAVIS,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Gulf.

HDQRS. CONFEDERATE FORCES IN THE FIELD,

Near Baton Rouge, La., August 6, 1862.

SIR: I have sent Major De Baun with a flag of truce, with the request that he will be allowed to attend to the burial of our dead who may have been left within your line. Major Haynes, accompanying desires to communciate with Brigadier General Charles Clark, that he may supply him with money and clothing and such articles as may contribute to his comfort.

Respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Major-General, Commanding.

COMMANDING OFFICER OF THE U. S. FORCES,

Baton Rouge, La.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Baton Rouge, La., August 6, 1862.

GENERAL: In reply to your communication of this morning, under a flag of truce, I have the honor to say that we are now engaged in the burial of your dead within our lines and that we shall soon finish the now nearly accomplished work.

General Clark and his aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Yerger, have surrendered themselves as prisoners of war, and are being cared for by our surgeons. A friend of General Clark from this city will attend to his pecuniary wants.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. W. CAHILL,

Colonel, Commanding.

Major General J. C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Commanding Confederate Forces.

BATON ROUGE, LA., August 9, 1862.

SIR: Being called to the command of the forces at Baton Rouge on the occasion of the action of August 5 by the unfortunate death of General Williams, it becomes my duty to report the circumstances of the glorious victory:

Rumors of an advance of the enemy in heavy force had prevailed for some days. On the afternoon of August 4 General Williams called the attention of the commandants of regiments and batteries to the probability of an attack at an early hour in the morning. The Fourteenth