War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0799 Chapter XXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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tender of services with gratification, and should be pleased to see him here as soon as possible, with such officers and men as he may have at his disposition for service in South Carolina. The movements of the enemy at Port Royal have become suspicious, and indicate an early movement in some direction. Looking to the moral and political consequences of the fall of Charleston, it would appear this is their most probable point of attack. They may take counsel with their fears, however, and seek some more vulnerable position, with the hope that in the course of events they may yet be able to humanity Charleston. On the other hand, award relations with France may counsel an immediate venture upon this city, as events may tend to make the attack impracticable in another month.

With many thanks for your offer of your troops, I am, very truly, your friend,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA, Charleston, S. C., March 1, 1863.

President of Charleston and Savannah Railroad:

SIR: For a successful defense of the line of the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, with the limited number of troops at disposal, rapid concentration at any threatened point is essential, and to effect this I am instructed by the commanding general to represent to you the importance of placing at the disposition of General Walker at Pocotaligo Station a train of cars capable of carrying a thousand men.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff.

CHARLESTON, S. C., March 1, 1863.

JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

Troops furnished by South Carolina and Georgia mainly armed and are men not liable to conscription; but should like at least 3,000 arms at my disposition soon as practicable. Some of the North Carolina troops came without arms. Enemy at Port Royal appeared to be on movement of some sort yesterday.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

CHARLESTON, S. C., March, 1, 1863.

Brigadier General H. W. MERCER, Savannah, Ga.:

You are authorized to accept armed State troops as many others as we can arm. Let me know what number arms you will require. Troops accepted must not be subject to conscription.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA, Charleston, S. C., March 1, 1863.

D. N. INGRAHAM,

Flag-Officer, Commanding C. S. Naval Forces, Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: The movements of the enemy in Port Royal Harbor yesterday