War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0768 COASTS OF S.C., GA., AND MID. AND EAST FLA. Chapter XXVI.

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CHARLESTON, February 7, 1863.

General S. COOPER:

State Legislature refuses to allow eight regiments reserves to remain longer in service. Shall their conscripts be retained? My troops from Wilmington have become more indispensable than ever. Enemy evidently meditates an attack on Charleston or Savannah.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

[Indorsement.]

FEBRUARY 8, 1863.

Retain the conscripts of the reserve regiments. General Whiting telegraphs he has returned to you your two brigades. He is now telegraphed to send back all the force received from you.

S. C.

CHARLESTON, S. C., February 7, 1863.

Brigadier General W. H. C. WHITTING, Wilmington, N. C.:

Would like to have all my troops soon as you can spare them; appearances of an early attack here or Savannah are daily more threatening. Their field transportation is indispensable, for I hope to get more troops soon.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

CHARLESTOWN, S. C., February 7, 1863.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Enemy's fleet at Hilton Head on 5th instant reported four steam frigates, thirteen gunboats, and fifty-three transports-shops, steamers, brigs, and schooners.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

CHARLESTON, S. C., February 8, 1863.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

Cannot a reliable brigadier-general be sent to assist General Mercer, who commands Districts of Georgia. I have no choice except that he be competent; otherwise consequences of serious attack by enemy may be disastrous. Case is urgent.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

CHARLESTON, S. C., February 8, 1863.

M. L. BONHAM,

Governor of State of South Carolina, Columbia, S. C.:

Every indications is that Charleston or Savannah will soon be attacked by an overwhelming force. Not much assistance can be expected from Confederate Government, and no chance of even temporary success should at this moment be allowed the enemy.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.