War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0661 Chapter XXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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we can drive back any reasonable force the Abolitionists may bring against us.

Permit me to request that the general, in assigning the two cavalry companies, if he be pleased to grant my petition, will do me the favor to select two of three companies belonging to my regiment, which are stationed near Charleston, viz: Captain Cordes' company, on James Island; the Rebel Troop; Captain Seabrook's company, at Adams Run, and Captain Campbell's company, at Jacksonborough Ferry.

I have the honor to remain, with great respect, your obedient servant,

C. J. COLCOCK,

Commanding Post.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. EAST AND MIDDLE'S FLORIDA, Numbers 1342.

Gainesville, October 30, 1862.

Captain Dickison will remove all negroes having no owners with them and free negroes from the Saint John's River into the interior at a safe distance from the enemy, and place them in charge of some white person, to be held subject to their owners' orders, and in case of free negroes to be left in their own charge, subject to the laws of the State.

By order of Brigadier-General Finegan:

W. CALL,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Charleston, S. C., October 31, 1862.

Honorable S. R. MALLORY,

Secretary of the Navy, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: On my return yesterday from Savannah I found here your letter of the 20th instant. I thank you for the prompt and favorable support you have given me in the desire to construct one of Captain F. D. Lee's marine torpedo rams, which I think is destined ere long to change the system of naval warfare, for it is evident that if ships are constructed invulnerable above water they must be attacked under it, where most vulnerable. I confidently believe that with three of these light-draught torpedo rams and as many iron-clad gunboat-rams this harbor could be held against any naval force of the enemy, who could never bring here seaworthy iron-clad gunboats or steamers of light draught that could withstand the destructive effects of our harbor rams. The same means can also be used (with one less of each class) for Savannah and Mobile.

I wish it understood, however, that I never desired to remove the construction of that torpedo ram from the competent naval officer in command of this station. All that I desired was to see it afloat and ready for action as soon as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.