War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0590 COAST OF S. C., GA., AND MID. AND EAST FLA. Chapter XXVI.

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interests in the neighborhood of Georgetown consist of one field battery of six pieces, equipped, and five companies of cavalry. These cavalry companies are very poorly armed-some of them almost without arms which can be relied on. I have none to furnish them and have no means of getting them. No inconsiderable portion of the other troops in this department are in the same condition. I therefore respectfully urge upon the War Department the necessity of directing that at least 1,000 stand of short Enfield or Brunswick rifles be placed at my disposal.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA,

Charleston, S. C., July 27, 1862.

Brigadier General W. D. SMITH,

Commanding, &c., Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding to say Captain Walker has been ordered immediately to proceed to the construction of a work on Sullivan's Island, and that he has already received instructions on the subject.

R. W. MEMMINGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA,

Charleston, S. C., July 28, 1862.

Brigadier General W. D. SMITH,

Commanding, &c., Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding desires that three 8-inch columbiads on the east face of Fort Sumter for a 10-inch columbiad be face of the fort; also that a travers-circle for a 10-inch columbiad be constructed on the parapet of the northeast face of the fort. I am further directed to say that Major Rhett has received personal instructions as to the above changes. It is desired therefore that you see that such changes are carried out.

R. W. MEMMINGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

RICHMOND, July 31, 1862.

Messrs. HIRAM ROBERTS and others,

Savannah, Ga.:

GENTLEMEN: Your communication of the 22nd instant has been received and referred to the Navy Department for information.

The iron seized by that Department was taken for the completion of gunboats. The whole amount will be insufficient for the boats intended for the defense of Savannah alone, and it will be necessary to seek elsewhere for the requisite balance of material.

Land defenses can be built without iron, but it is indispensable for plated boats; and, further than this, it is hoped that the boats, when