War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0589 Chapter XXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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to Brigadier General W. D. Smith, commanding First Military District of South Carolina. You will perceive that General Smith concurs with me in the opinion that no more troops can be spared for the defense of Georgetown and vicinity. Heavy guns for that purpose are out of the question. I want at least 100 more for the defense of Charleston in the contingency of the enemy's gunboats passing Forts Sumter and Moultrie. There are persons who believe that the withdrawal of the batteries from Georgetown was a wanton exercise of power on my part, who assert that they were sufficient to have prevented the entrance of the enemy's fleets, &c., and that I should even now be compelled to replace them. I am content to let these individuals enjoy their opinions, but I must, nevertheless, continue to act on my own judgment unless controlled by superior authority. It would afford me the most sincere pleasure to protect all the private interests of the citizens of Georgetown and vicinity and of the whole coast if it were in my power to do so. I am well aware, too, that where private interests are so large that of the public is also materially affected; but if I am without the means of protecting all, I must to the best of my judgment and ability, apply means I have to the security and welfare of those which are vital.

I have had the honor to receive this day another communication from General Harllee and yourself, inclosing a letter from the Honorable R. F. W. Allston, in relation to the enemy's depredations near Georgetown, that measures be taken to increase the efficiency of Major Emanuel's command. At present I have few or no arms at my disposal. I will, however, renew my exertions to obtain them, and if successful devote them to this special purpose.

On Wednesday next, unless absolutely prevented by more urgent business, I propose visiting Major Emanuel's position, and will endeavor to rectify what may be amiss in the disposition of his command. I should be very much pleased to be accompanied by yourself or General Harllee.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA,

Charleston, S. C., July 26, 1862.

Honorable JAMES CHESNUT, Jr.,

Chief of Department of Military:

SIR: In reply to your communication, asking an official statement of the amount of negro labor required to complete the defenses of Charleston and the State, and for what time the labor will be wanted, I have the honor to inform you that 1,600 negroes can be kept constantly and usefully employed for two months, or perhaps longer, at the obstructions and defensive works about Charleston. I do not know that labor for military purposes is needed elsewhere in the State for the present.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA,

Charleston, S. C., July 27, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector-General:

GENERAL: The only troops I can spare for the protection of the