War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0565 Chapter XXVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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against the troops of this garrison as regards their loyalty, and as this feeling has spread over various parts of the State, I must respectfully request, if it be compatible with the defense of this post and harbor, that we be transferred to some place where some confidence can be placed in us, and where we will have an early opportunity of proving to the citizens of Charleston the wrong they have done us. If not as artillery, the men are sufficiently well drilled as infantry to take the field as such immediately.

I earnestly request that this feeling may be brought to the notice of the brigadier-general commanding for his consideration. It is evident in what an unpleasant and, as regards us, unfair position we are placed by the strong distrust evinced toward us by the citizens of Charleston. I am confident, sir, that if the sentiment of the officers of this garrison were known they would coincide with mine artillery.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH A. YATES,

Captain Artillery, C. S. Army.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA,

Charleston, S. C., June 14, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel A. J. GONZALES, Chief of Artillery, &C.:

COLONEL: The major-general commanding directs me to inform you that he has instructed Captain W. H. Echols to lay out a battery near Newton's Cut, to consist of a 42-pounder rifled gun, barbette, four siege 8-inch howitzers, and two siege 24-pounder rifled guns, the position to be designated by Colonel Wagner. The major-general directs that you render all assistance in your power to Captain Echols, that the work may be completed at the earliest possible moment.

J. C. TAYLOR,

Aide-de-Camp.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA,

Charleston, S. C., June 14, 1862.

Colonel COLQUITT:

COLONEL: It is a matter of the greatest importance that the enemy's gunboats be prevented from lying off Newton's Cut and thus cutting us off from using the bridge and the road. I design establishing a battery at the lower extremity of the wood on the western side of the Cut. The battery will consist of a banded and rifled 42-pounder, four 8-inch siege howitzers, and two 24-pounder rifled guns. With this battery we ought to drive the gunboats as low down as Grimball's but to erect it it will be necessary to employ the soldiers of your and Colonel De Saussure's regiments. Negroes could not be trusted to work so near the enemy. The most perfect silence should be maintained and the greatest energy and determination upon the part of the men to carry should be present with the working parties. You will furnish, in conjunction with Colonel De Saussure, as many men as the engineer officer in charge of the work may find it necessary to call for, and I ask of Colonel De Saussure and yourself to aid and advance it to the utmost of your ability.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

[Major-General, Commanding.]