War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0488 COAST OF S.C.,GA., AND MID. AND EAST FLA. Chapter XXVI.

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Abstract from Monthly Return of the troops of the Department of East and Middle Florida, commanded by Brigadier General Joseph Finegan, for April, 1862.

Present for duty.

Troops. Officers Men Aggregate Aggrega-

present te

present

and

absent

4th Florida 35 480 592 812

Regiment

5th Florida 26 440 587 856

Regiment

6th Florida 31 511 665 782

Regiment

1st Florida 19 152 298 492

Special Battalion

Smith's cavalry 4 67 71 98

troop

Tallahassee Guards 1 82 84 94

(cavalry)

Saint John's 2 35 37 87

Rangers

Baya's light 2 50 59 71

artillery

Gamble's light 5 74 79 146

artillery

Marion Light 4 109 113 113

Artillery

Milton Light 2 98 112 120

Artillery

Simmons' coast 2 35 37 55

guard

Hopkins' 2 57 61 78

independent

company

Turner's 4 40 51 62

independent

company

Captain Chambers' 4 76 80 80

company

Captain Dudley's 2 50 54 93

company

Captain Gettis' 4 57 68 84

company

Captain Owens' 3 95 115 116

company

Captain Parsons' 3 58 61 71

company

Captain Smith's 3 39 45 83

company

Grand total 158 2,605 3,269 4,393

TALLAHASSEE, May 1, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose, for the information of the general-in-chief, an appeal to the people of Florida to destroy their cotton on the near approach of the enemy, &c.

With great respect,

JOSEPH FINEGAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL FORCES,

DEPARTMENT OF EAST AND MIDDLE FLORIDA,

Tallahassee, May 1, 1862.

To the People of Florida:

The commanding general of this military department thinks it his duty to request all persons owning or having the control of cotton within this department to have it so placed that if necessary it may be burned without injury to other property. A confident appeal is made to the patriotic citizens of the State to destroy their cotton on the near approach of the enemy rather than permit it to fall into the hands of the invaders of our country.

The commanding general will endeavor to protect every portion of his department, but if the means at his command should prove inadequate to repel a large force penetrating the country, he will not hesitate to order the destruction of all the cotton rather than suffer it to pass into the possession of an enemy whose purposes are those of plunder and subjugation. It is not presumed from present appearances or from