War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0402 Chapter XXVI. COASTS OF S. C., GA., AND MID. AND EAST FLA.

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Your threatened arrest of General Foster is therefore disapproved, It is to be regretted, general, that on the eve of important movements, when the most cordial co-operation of all the officers of the Government is imperatively required, anything should be permitted to occur which is calculated to disturb the harmony of the service. If the plans of the Government should fail to be carried out for want of this harmony, those who have engendered or fostered animosities and jealousies will incur a very serious responsibility.

General Naglee's protect to you being disapproved, the Secretary of War has directed that he relieved from duty in your department./

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, February 16, 1863.

Major General J. G. FOSTER, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Colonel Townsend, of the Adjutant-General's Department, will furnish you a copy or show you the original of my letter of this date to Major-General Hunter. This, with my letter of yesterday to General Hunter, of which you haven a copy, will furnish you with the views of the Government in regard to the relations between yourself and General Hunter in regard to your commands in South Carolina. While your command will remain as a distinct corps organization, not to be merged into the Tenth Army Corps, both you and it will be subject to General Hunter's orders so long as you are on duty in his department.

As the course by General Naglee in objecting to furnish his superior officer with proper returns and the spirit of his protest are disapproved, the Secretary of War directs that you release him from further duty in the Department of the South.

Colonel Townsend has instructions from the War Department to relieve under certain contingencies other officers.

Harmony of action and a cordial co-operation of all officers in the contemplated expedition are absolutely essential to its success. Those who in any way interfere with this harmony will be dealt with as they deserve.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

BALTIMORE, MD., February 16, 1863-10 p. m.

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief;

I have just received your letter of this date, by the hands of Colonel Townsend, the train having been delayed by an accident. It is with regret that I received your order to relieve General Naglee, because he only carried out my instructions. General Hunter will probably regard it as a triumph over the respectful action of General Naglee, and this will, I fear, lead to interferences and mortifications inflicted on me when I return. This action after I left, in direct violation of our verbal understanding, leaves me little to except from his magnanimity. I would respectfully suggest that some other officer of experience, as General Burnside, be sent down instead of me, since he will go free from all misunderstanding, and thus be able to render greater service.