War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0290 COASTS OF S. C. GA., AND MID. AND EAST FLA. Chapter XXVI.

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This expedition of the enemy removes all fear of our supposed batteries on Stono, and no doubt we will have visits from them often.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHARLES H. SIMONTON,

Colonel, Commanding.

Captain W. F. NANCE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

JUNE 2, 1863.-Union rain on the Combahee River, S. C.

REPORTS.

Numbers 1.-Brigadier General W. S. Walker, C. S. Army, commanding Third Military District.

Numbers 2.-Major W. P. Emanuel, Fourth South Carolina Cavalry.

Numbers 3.-Captain H. Goodbold, Fourth South Carolina Cavalry.

Numbers 4.-Lieutenant P. L. Breeden, Fourth South Carolina Cavalry.

Numbers 5.-Lieutenant A. E. Glichrist, Fourth South Carolina Cavalry.

Numbers 6.-Lieutenant William E. Hewitt, Fourth South Carolina Cavarly.

Numbers 7.-Captain W. L. Trenholm, Rutledge Mounted Rifles and Horse Artillery.

Numbers 8.-Captain John F. Lay, C. S. Army, Inspector of Cavarly.

Numbers 1. Reports of Brigadier General W. S. Walker, C. S. Army, commanding Third Miliary District.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT, McPhersonville, June 17, 1863.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that on the 2nd instant I received a telegram at about 9 a. m. that the enemy had landed 200 or 300 men at Field's Point and that a gunboat was destroying the pontoon bridge at Combahee Ferry. I immediately ordered the entire command to protect to Pocotaligo Station and await further orders. I at once galloped to the section (3 miles distant) to put myself in telegraphic communication with the threatened point and to inform department headquarters.

Upon the arrival of my command I ordered three companies of the Eleventh South Carolina Infantry and Captain Trenholm's squadron of cavalry (one company dismounted) to proceed by my special train to Green Pond the whole under the command of Captain Trenholm, who was instructed to be governed in his operations by the last reports of the enemy's movements.

I sent with Carolina Trenholm an excellent map of the country and two guides.

One company of cavalry and a section of a battery were sent to Salkehatchie Bridge; one company and a section to Combahee Ferry.

This force I considered amply adequate to repel any advance of the Emanuel that the enemy were still advancing from Field's Point, and fearing they might have been re-enforced without the knowledge of our pickets, who had retired immediately on their approach, I telegraphed to Charleston for some field rifled pieces with an infantry support, and