War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0243 Chapter XXVI. ENGAGEMENT OF CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C.

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subordinate commanders, whose services he has fitly noticed in his own report.

To Colonel A. J. Gonzales, chief of ordnance and artillery, and Major D. B. Harris, chief engineer, and Major W. H. Echols, Provisional Engineer Corps, and their several assistants I return my thanks for valuable services in their respective departments.

I have also to record my obligations to the Honorable William Porcher Miles, Representative in Congress, for constantly exerted services in securing for the defense of Charleston so many of the heaviest guns wielded so effectually.

The Confederate States iron-clad ships Palmetto State and Chicora, under the command of Captain J. R. Tucker, C. S. Navy, as soon as the enemy advanced to the attack, took their positions, previously arranged, ready to perform their part in the conflict at the opportune moment. On the day after the combat Flag-Officer Lynch, C. S. Navy, arrived here from North Carolina with an effective detachment of sailor artillerists to tender service in any battery. He has assigned to a most responsible position-Cummings Point Battery-but was in three days thereafter recalled by the Navy Department.

The flags and trophies sent herewith were taken from the wreck of the Keokuk by Lieutenant W. T. Glassell, C. S. Navy. The more material trophies, two 11-inch Dahlgren pieces, now in battery, were recovered under the supervision of General Ripley by the mechanical resources and energy of Mr. Adolphus LaCoste, employe of the district ordnance department, assisted by parties from the garrison of Fort Sumter, under command of Lieutenant S. Cordes Boyleston, and Lieuts. J. M. Rhett and K. Kemper, First Regiment South Carolina Artillery.

The enemy's land forces, collected in considerable strength on Seabrook Island, and in transports in North Edisto River and on Folly, Cole's, and other islands about the mouth of the Stono River, made no attempt to co-operate actually with the naval attack.

In conclusion, I shall avail myself of the occasion to give as my opinion that the best, the easiest, way to render Fort Sumter impregnable would be to arm, conformably to its original plan, both tiers of casemates and the barbette, with the heaviest guns, rifled or smooth-bore, that can be made.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

[Inclosure.]

[Copied from United States journals.]

Rounds.

New Ironsides fired............................... 8

Catskill fired.................................... 25

Keokuk fired...................................... 3

Montauk fired..................................... 26

Nantucket fired................................... 15

Passaic fired..................................... 9

Nahant fired...................................... 24

Weehawken fired................................... 26

Patapsco fired.................................... 18

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