War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0133 Chapter XXVI. EXPEDITION FROM HILTON HEAD, S. C.

Search Civil War Official Records

stationed on a flat-boat to protect our landing. The party, however, did not arrive with the piece until 12 o'clock, in consequence of the difficulty of dragging it through the swamp. Being anxious to have as little delay as possible, I did not await the arrival of the howitzer, but at 11 a. m. moved forward, and as I advanced the enemy fled. After reaching the house I awaited the arrival of the Seventh Connecticut and the howitzer. After they arrived I moved forward to the head of Mount Pleasant Creek to a bridge, at which place I arrived at 2 p. m. Here I found the bridge destroyed, but which I had repaired in a short time. I then crossed it and moved down on the south bank toward Mount Pleasant Landing. After moving about 1 mile down the bank of the creek my skirmishing companies came upon a camp, which evidently had been very hastily evacuated, from the fact that the occupants had left a table standing with a sumptuous meal already prepared for eating. Ont he center of the table was placed a fine, large mare pie still warm, from which ne of the party had already served his plate. The skirmisher also saw 3 mounted men leave the place in hot haste. I also found a small quantity of commissary and quartermaster's toes, with 23 tents, which, for want of transportation, I was obliged to destroy. After moving about a mile farther on I came across another camp, which also indicated the same sudden evacuation. In it I found the following articles, viz: Eighteen Hall's breech-loading carbines, 12 double-barreled shot-guns, 8 -breech-loading Maynard rifles, 11 Enfiled rifles, and 96 knapsacks. those articles I brought along by having the men carry them. There were, besides, a small quantity of commissary and quartermaster's stores, including 16 tents, which, for the same reason as stated, I ordered to be destroyed. I then pushed forward to the landing, where I arrived at 7 p. m.

We drove the enemy's skirmishers in small parties along the entire march. The march was a difficult one, in consequence of meeting so many swamps almost knee-deep.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

T. H. GOOD,

Colonel Forty-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

Captain LAMBERT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Saint John's Bluff, Fla., October 3, 1862.

SIR: For the information of the general commanding I have the honor to make the following report:

At 9 o'clock last night Lieutenant Cannon reported to me that his command, consisting of one section of the First Connecticut Battery, was then coming up the creek on flat-boats with a view of landing. At 4 o'clock this morning a safe landing was effected and the command was ready to move. The order to move to Saint John's Bluff reached me at 4 p. m. yesterday. In accordance with it I put the column in motion immediately and moved cautiously up the bank of the Saint John's River, the skirmishing companies occasionally seeing small parties of the enemy's cavalry retiring in our front as we advanced. When about 2 miles from the bluff the left wing of the skirmishing lien came upon another camp of the enemy, which, however, in consequence of the lateness of the hour, I did not take to examine, it being then already dark.