War of the Rebellion: Serial 020 Page 0014 COASTS OF S. C., GA., AND MID. AND EAST FLA. Chapter XXVI.

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guns aboard, intended for the harbor, was stolen in Charleston this morning.

Very respectfully, &c.,

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Major-General, Commanding.

General R. E. LEE, Richmond, Va.

Numbers 2. Report of General Roswell S. Ripley, C. S. Army, commanding Second Military District of South Carolina.

HDQRS. 2nd MILITARY DISTRICT OF SOUTH CAROLINA,

Charleston, S. C., May 14, 1862.

MAJOR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a report from Lieutenant Ravenel, aide-de-camp, concerning the stealing of the steamer Planter from this post; also a report from Major Alfred Rhett, commandant at For Sumter. The mischief has occurred from the negligence of the captain and officers of the boat and their disobedience of orders, a copy of which is herewith inclosed, and which had been repeatedly urged upon them. I shall prefer charges against them at an early and lay them before the general commanding the department.

R. S. RIPLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Major J. R. WADDY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Charleston, S. C.

Numbers 3. Report of Lieutenant F. G. Ravenel, C. S. Army, Aide-de-Camp.

HDQRS. 2nd MILITARY DISTRICT OF SOUTH CAROLINA,

Charleston, S. C., May 13, 1862.

GENERAL: I have the report that the steamer Planter was stolen from Southern Wharf at between 3 and 3.30 o'clock this morning and taken to the enemy's fleet, off the bar, where she was visible till late in the forenoon. By telegram from Stono this afternoon it is reported that she has gone south. The Planter is high-pressure light-draught boat, drawing ordinarily not more than 3 1/2 miles to 4 feet, and has been employed in the Confederate service in the transportation of ordnance, &c., to and from the various posts in the harbor and other localities in the neighborhood. She was under the command of C. J. Relyea as master, Samuel H. Smith, a Charleston pilot, being mate, and Zerich Pitcher engineer, with a colored crew, eight in number, and all slaves. Neither the captain, mate, nor engineer were on board at the time of her departure, notwithstanding paragraph VIII, in Orders, Numbers 5, viz: