War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0921 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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to them yesterday I told them that clothing had been received at Fort Smith for the Indian troops. The Choctaws and Chickasaws are as true and loyal a people as ever lived. I write this letter both for the information of the Secretary of War and yourself, and I trust you will forward it to him by the first sure conveyance across the Mississippi River.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. S. SCOTT,

Agent, &c.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF MISSISSIPPI AND EAST LOUISIANA,

Jackson, Miss., November 18, 1862.

Lieutenant-General HOLMES, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: The following telegram has been received at these headquarters, viz:

SHUFORDSVILLE, November 17, 1862.

(Via Panola. Forwarded from Abbeville.)

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON:

Twelve transports, with three gunboats, loaded with troops, passed Friar's Point this evening, I suppose for Vicksburg.

E. D. PORTER,

Captain, Commanding Coahoma Cavalry.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

RICHMOND, November 19, 1862.

Lieutenant General T. H. HOLMES,

Little Rock, Ark., via Vicksburg, Miss.:

Vicksburg is threatened and requires to be re-enforced. Can you send troops from your command-say 10,000-to operate either opposite to Vicksburg or to cross the river? It is conceded here that this movement will greatly add to the defense of Arkansas.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

WARREN, TEX., November 19, 1862.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES:

SIR: I am here a prisoner, in the custody of a captain and 48 men of Shelby's brigade of Missouri troops, on my way to Little Rock, by virtue of the order from Brigadier General John Selden Roane, of which I inclose a copy, marked A.

I was seized near Tishomingo, in the Chickasaw country, on the 14th instant, when returning to Fort Washita from Fort Arbuckle, where I had gone expecting to march to the Wichita Agency to repel an invasion of hostile Indians.

From a previous order of General Hindman to Colonel Cooper, a copy of which was sent me by Colonel Sampson Folsom, and of which I inclose a copy, marked B, I conclude that the cause of my apprehension is that I had reassumed the command of the Indian country. I did so