War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0911 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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is accepted, and General Cooper is appointed to succeed him as Indian Commissioner, &c., but there are matters connected with him which render it necessary that he should not take immediate charge, and hence I am directed to put some competent officer there for the present; and inferring from all I have heard that future developments will have a tendency to increase rather than diminish the difficulties with General Cooper, I am most anxious to fall on a suitable general officer for the command. If you know of such an officer east of the Mississippi please inform me, as I am assured by the War Department that he will be ordered on my request. In the mean time you must order General Roane to assume the duties of superintendent if you think it necessary that there should be no interregnum. In reference to the payment and clothing of your troops, in addition to what you had, I have sent you $750,000. It is believed this will pay all arrearages of pay up to June 30, which is the date to which the troops near here are being paid. As my letters inform me there in such suffering and some discontent among the friendly Indians, I shall write to Stand Watie and Folsom and McIntosh that their commands will be paid at least a part of what is due them, and also that their command will be paid at least a part of what is due them, and also that clothing will be issued to them. In order that you may be able to issue to the Indians the clothing intended for them, I ave directed Major Burton to forward to you all that he has on hand, amounting to--suits. The steamer having your arms aboard cannot get up; they will be brought to you in wagons as soon as possible. Can it be possible the enemy were frightened at he movement of Parsons? If so, he must be much weaker than we have supposed, and when we are ready we will, I trust, be able to go after him. Nothing doing in the east except the Yankee papers say they will have the Mississippi River at an early day, with the Arkansas as high up as Little Rock.

I am, general, yours, very truly,

THE. H. HOLMES,

Major-General.

RICHMOND, VA., November 6, 1862.

Lieutenant General T. H. HOLMES, Little Rock, Ark.:

It is quite impossible at this time to send you the skeleton Arkansas regiments east of the Mississippi.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

RICHMOND, VA., November 8, 1862.

Lieutenant General T. H. HOLMES, Little Rock, Ark.:

GENERAL: The Secretary of War directs that you will have all the seizures of cloth made under your direction released. he also directs me to inform you that these seizures are unauthorized and are viewed as unreasonable, and that they defeat all effort to clothe the armies operating east of the Mississippi. You will send an officers with the cloth to protect it from further seizure until it comes to the Mississippi, and report the execution of this order.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.