War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0885 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

13th. Colonel Dawson's regiment and Lieutenant-Colonel Crawford's battalion will report to Colonel Dunnington for duty in the fortifications. Colonel Garland will afford him whatever aid may be necessary, and these officers are charged to act in concert with each other.

14th. Captains Fitzhugh and Williams, Corps of Engineers, will report to Colonel Dunnington for duty. Captain Clarkson's company of sappers and miners will report to Colonel Dunnington for duty, and be under his orders.

15th. Colonel Garland will immediately issue an order to concentrate his brigade at some point near the Post of Arkansas, and is made responsible for the defense of the fortifications against any land attack of the enemy.

16th. Colonel Flournoy will report immediately, with his regiment Texas Infantry, to Brigadier General A. Nelson, at his camp near Austin.

17th. Major General G. H. Hill, commanding battalion of light artillery, will move from his present camp, on Bayou Metoe, to a position near Austin.

18th. The proper staff officers will provide promptly for the movement, subsistence, and equipment of the troops referred to in the preceding paragraphs of this order.

By order of Major General T. H. Holmes;

S. S. ANDERSON,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 227.

Richmond, Va., September 29, 1862.

* * * *

XVIII. Brigadier General D. H. Cooper is assigned to duty as Superintendent of Indian Affairs by virtue of act of Congress permitting such assignment.

* * * *

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT, Numbers 43.

Little Rock, Ark., October 1, 1862.

* * * *

II. The present production of salt in this department is not sufficient for supplying the army and the people. The price demanded is extortionate, and great inconvenience has ensued and much suffering will result from this cause. It is believed it can be remedied by carrying on the works on Government account; therefore all salt-works within the State of Arkansas and the Indian Territory which are not producing to their greatest capacity will be taken possession of by an agent of the Confederate States, to be designated from these headquarters, who will take steps at once to increase their production to the greatest extent possible. For this purpose he will be authorized to obtain, by hire or purchase, or, if necessary, by impressment, the requisite labor and material. The quartermaster's and commissary departments will afford him every aid and assistance possible. The agent will set apart monthly