War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0830 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N. W. Chapter XXV.

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I have the honor, sir, to inclose a copy of an address which I have issued to-day to the soldiers and citizens of the district.

I am, Governor, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. C. HINDMAN,

Major-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Numbers 8.

Richmond, January 10, 1862.

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XIX. That part of the State of Louisiana north of Red River, the Indian Territory west of Arkansas, and the States of Arkansas and Missouri, excepting therefrom the tract of country east of the Saint Francis bordering on the Mississippi River from the mouth of the Saint Francis to Scott County, Missouri (which tract will remain in the district of Major-General Polk), is constituted the Trans-Mississippi District of Department Numbers 2, and Major General Earl Van Dorn is assigned to the command of the same. He will immediately repair to Bowling Green, Ky., and report for duty to General A. S. Johnston, commanding Department Numbers 2.

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By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]*

HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DISTRICT,

Little Rock, Ark., May 31, 1862.

To the Soldiers and Citizens of the District:

I have come here to drive out the invader or to perish in the attempt.

To achieve success it is essential that the soldier and the citizen each shall do his whole duty.

In the army a discipline must prevail unexcelled among the troops of any Government every officer executing the orders given him with promptness, fidelity, and courage; every soldier obeying the orders he receives without question and without murmur, whatever the hardships involved. In one word, there must be efficiency among officers of every rank and obedience among soldiers under all circumstances. Among citizens a determination must be evinced to contribute to the army's support even to the last dollar which they possess; to adhere to the Confederate cause under every difficulty; to sustain the Confederate currency; to crush out the spirit of extortion and speculation, and to sacrifice for freedom's sake all property valuable to the enemy which may be possibility fall into his hands.

My purpose is to assume every responsibility necessary in the premises, relying upon the great Arbiter of Nations and the earnest and active support of every patriot.

T. C. HINDMAN,

Major-General.

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*For other inclosures (General Orders), see p. 28.

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