War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0795 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

Camp Babcock, November 15, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER AT ELKHORN:

I have reliable information that the enemy are in large force in front of me. General Marmaduke, with the advance, consisting of 5,000 Missouri troops and four pieces of artillery, were at Rhea's Mill yesterday. Hindman with a large force is coming from Mulberry Creek to join him, and probably has done so before this. I have chosen a strong position and await their attack. If their force does not exceed 20,000 I can fight them successfully, and I do not think that all the force they can bring against me will reach that number. They evidently intend to make a desperate effort to enter Missouri. They now have three excellent mills in their possession this die of mountains, from which they sustain themselves. If I had sufficient force I would attack them there, but I cannot do so with safety and protect my transportation. If they were driven from these mills they would be compelled to retreat across the mountains, which would be equivalent to a disbanding of it, at least the Missouri portion of it.

I have no doubt they meditate an attack upon me in superior force, but I am prepared to meet them and shall not retreat one inch. I wish you to scout thoroughly in the direction of Elm Springs, Fayetteville, and White River, and keep me advised of all information you may obtain of the movements of the enemy. My camp is on Lindsay's Prairie, on the Line road, 14 miles south of Maysville. You will immediately telegraph a copy of this communication to General Schofield.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. G. BLUNT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

Springfield, November 16, 1862.

Brigadier-General BLUNT,

Camp Fourteen miles south of Maysville:

The Second and Third Divisions march to-morrow to re-enforce you. They will move by Cassville, and thence probably west of Bentonville. Keep me advised of your position and the enemy's movements.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

Springfield, November 16, 1862-6 p. m.

Brigadier General JAMES TOTTEN,

Commanding Second and Third Divisions, Army of the Frontier:

GENERAL: General Schofield directs that you will move your command by forced marches, commencing to-morrow morning, as indicated in my communication last night, to wit, by the most practicable route to the Wire road leading from here to Fayetteville, and thence by that road to Cassville, or a point this side, from which a better road may be had to the near vicinity of Pineville. More definite instructions as to the road beyond the road called the Fayetteville will be sent to you to-morrow or by the time reach the Wire road. The supplies will