War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0785 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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DEPARTMENT OF MISSOURI,

November 9, 1862.

Brigadier-General SCHOFIELD, Springfield, Mo.:

You can judge best who to leave. Your force united with Warren's would be none too strong for proper offensive movement, but it will not do to leave a door open in southwest, so you will have to leave some very reliable force. Enrolled Militia get no pay, and will get tired of the service as the winter comes on. It will not do to depend on them alone for garrison duty. General Halleck directs me to send south from Pilot all I can spare. It is hard to tell what I can spare. I wish you could report all you know of the enemy in front and what force you need to garrison the southwest and successfully move down into Arkansas. I would like also to have a copy of your letter from General Halleck of the 18th, concerning Steele's co-operation.

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

Springfield, November 9, 1862.

Brigadier-General HERRON, Crane Creek:

You will move your division of the army to-morrow to a convenient camping ground a mile or two east of Ozark.

By order of Brigadier-General Schofield:

C. W. MARSH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

Springfield, November 9, 1862.

Brigadier General JAMES TOTTEN, Maysville,

(Care of General Herron, Crane Cree):

You will move your division of the army to-morrow to a convenient camping ground at or near Ozark.

By order of Brigadier-General Schofield:

C. W. MARSH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

Camp Bowen, November 9, 1862.

Brigadier General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD,

Commanding Army of Frontier:

GENERAL: My scouts sent to Fort Smith have returned. They report about 3,000 troops at that place and Van Buren, a portion of them Missourians and some of the fragments of Cooper's command. Rebels very much alarmed at the advance of our army. Scouts and refugees from Fort Gibson report Stand Watie across the Arkansas with about 600 men. Since the rout of Cooper at Fort Wayne many of the Indians in the rebel service have thrown down their arms and gone home, and declare their purpose to join the Federal troops the first opportunity that presents itself. Everything looks favorable in the Indian Territory if our advantages are followed up. It is all important to occupy the Indian country as far south as the Arkansas River.

50 R R - VOL XIII