War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0755 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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the protection of the lines of communication with Fort Scott and Springfield.

General Blunt will communicate frequently (in cipher) to the commanding general his position and movements and any information he may have of the enemy.

General Salomon's brigade (First Division) will remain at or near its present camp until further order.

General Salomon will keep strong scouting parties on all roads leading to his position, and use every possible precaution to avoid a surprise and to gain the earliest possible information of any movement of the enemy toward his position.

The baggage and supply trains left at this camp are placed under his special charge, and if attacked he will defend them to the last extremity. Should General Salomon be advised of the approach of an overwhelming force he will retire with the train toward Keetsville, fighting every step of the way necessary to preserve it.

General Salomon will keep Generals Blunt and Schofield advised of the condition of affairs in his vicinity.

By order of Brigadier-General Schofield:

CHARLES S. SHELDON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHWEST,

Saint Paul, Minn., October 20, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Washington, D. C.:

There will probably be no fight with the Yanktons. The war is over. All the Sioux prisoners will be brought to Fort Snelling. I would be glad to get decision on question of disarming annuity Indians, &c. Many Sioux and some Winnebago criminals must be executed. Will send names as soon as possible.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., October 21, 1862.

Major-General POPE, Saint Paul, Minn.:

No answer from the Department of Interior in regard to disarming Indians.

How many regiments are ready for service in the Southwest?

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

ELKHORN TAVERN, ARK., October 21, 1862.

Major General SAMUEL R. CURTIS:

Armed reconnaissances south and east have demonstrated the truth of my conjecture of yesterday. Rains has gone to Huntsville and Cooper toward Maysville, leaving a small cavalry force in our front to cover the movements. I shall march after Rains to-night with Totten's and Herron's divisions. General Blunt, with two brigades, will start in pursuit of Cooper. One brigade of Blunt's division will remain here for