War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0729 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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and potatoes there might be gathered and prove useful in military operations in this quarter.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. SIBLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJT. GEN'S OFFICE, Numbers 155.

Washington, October 11, 1862.

The Territories of Colorado and Nebraska are included in the Department of the Missouri.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

CASSVILLE, MO., October 12, 1862.

Major General SAMUEL R. CURTIS:

I arrived at this place at 11 o'clock a. m. to-day with General Totten's division. My right rests at Keetsville to-night. General Blunt's division is 7 miles west, and General Herron is at Crane Creek, coming up. We have driven the enemy from Missouri. His force seems much demoralized and was retreating rapidly, according to last reports. I doubt whether he will take a stand this side of Boston Mountains. I cannot safety advance far beyond this point with my present force until I get more definite information as to re-enforcements, which may be coming up from the south or southeast. I have sent down White River to ascertain if there is any movement from that direction. Perhaps you may be able to give me information as to this matter. My last reliable news says the Texas troops have gone to Little Rock. If so, the force in front of me is only from 17,000 to 20,000, not all armed. I can whip them whenever they may choose their ground. My command is in good health and condition; but some of the Indian regiments are destitute of tents and blankets. Can they not be supplied?

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo., October 12, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

GENERAL: Many of the Enrolled Militia of this State have been and are in actual service. They have been called out for stated periods, say thirty days. Heretofore they have had half rations furnished by the Government, and I have ordered full rations when they seem to need and deserve them. There are many of them doing good service, and very much need blankets and clothing. A month or two's service would be worth a suit of clothes. There is a large quantity of gray clothing here that can be colored; also a quantity of condemned clothing. I recommend the issue of such damaged clothing to these troops that have served a month and are again on duty to serve thirty days at my discretion. I would in such discretion furnish the most needy and deserving. I submit the matter for your consideration. I have avoided making any call myself for militia; but they were called before