War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0599 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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answer from General Blunt. My messengers have been intercepted, one of them shot. I shall be glad to see Totten with his men; it will reassure the country. Rains remains at mills near Fayetteville.

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT PAUL, MINN., August 27, 1862-10.30 a.m.

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

We are in the midst of a most terrible and exciting Indian war. Thus far the massacre of innocent white settlers has been fearful. A wild panic prevails in nearly one-half of the State. All are rushing to the frontier to defend settlers.

M. S. WILKINSON.

W. P. DOLE.

JNO. G. NICOLAY.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, August 27, 1862.

Governor RAMSEY,

Saint Paul, Minn.:

Yours received. Attend to the Indians. If the draft cannot proceed of course it will not proceed. Necessity knows no law. The Government cannot extend the time.

A. LINCOLN.

SAINT PAUL, MINN., August 27, 1862-4.10 p.m.

Honorable P. H. WATSON:

When the Indian war broke out, by proclamation I called out all the men of the counties adjacent to the seat of war, to furnish their own horses, arms, &c., and report to the officer in command. They from necessity were not mustered. There are about 700 out, and there ought, as near as can, to be a muster of men and horses. I will hereafter proceed to call out the three-months' men into the service of the United States. From policy I do not do it immediately.

ALEX. RAMSEY.

SAINT PAUL, MINN., August 27, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

The Indian war grows more extensive. The Sioux, numbering perhaps 2,000 warriors, are striking along a line of scattered frontier settlements of 200 miles, having already massacred several hundred whites, and the settlers of the whole border are in panic and flight, leaving their harvest to waste in the field, as I have myself seen even in neighborhoods where there is no danger. The Chippewas, a thousand warriors strong, are turbulent and threatening, and the Winnebagoes are suspected of hostile intent. The Governor is sending all available forces to the protection of the frontier, and organizing the militia, regular and irregular, to fight and restore confidence. As against the Sioux it must be a war of extermination. The Governor needs six field pieces complete, with horse equipments and fixed ammunition; six 12-pounder mountain howitzers; arms, accouterments, and horse equipments for 1,200 cavalry; 5,000 or 6,000 guns, with 500,000 cartridges to