War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0589 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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communication of Major-General Curtis, and indorsement of Major-General Halleck, to the effect that "it is of vital importance that the gunboats prevent the enemy from occupying the banks of the river between Memphis and the mouth of the Arkansas."

Commodore C. H. Davis, in command of the flotilla, has been instructed on this subject, and directions given him that the gunboats perform that duty as thoroughly as possible, and that they co-operate with the army as effectually as is in their power on all occasions. The primary object the flotilla is to keep the river unobstructed and to sweep from it all floating craft of every direction, but the officers are ordered and will esteem it a duty to assist the army in dispersing the shores and adjacent country of all enemies, not only between Memphis and the Arkansas River, but elsewhere.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GIDEON WELLES.

AUGUST 22, 1862.

Respectfully referred to the general-in-chief by order of the Secretary of War.

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War.

SPRINGFIELD, August 21, 1862.

Brigadier General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD:

Rains has crossed Boston Mountains with a force variously stated at 5,000 to 15,000 armed men, with artillery. I have heard nothing more from Colonel Carroll, who it is said left Fort Smith and has moved up to Cross Hollows. No news to-day from Colonel Wright.

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General.

SPRINGFIELD, August 21, 1862.

Brigadier General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD:

My effective force is about 4,500 men; of this 1,800, with four pieces of artillery, are in pursuit of Coffee; the rest, except 200 at Lebanon, can be concentrated in one day at this post. One thousand five hundred arms have arrived for the militia. Ten companies infantry (militia) are here. The balance are scouting about the country. I have five pieces of artillery.

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General.

SPRINGFIELD, August 21, 1862.

Brigadier General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD,

Saint Louis:

At dark on the 19th Colonel Wright was three hours behind Coffee, 3 miles east of him and 8 miles north of Montevallo. It was rumored that Coffee was chased by a Federal force, but Colonel Wright had not received a message since he moved from Greenfield. Colonel Wright's scouts report Coffee's horses very much jaded. Ours had the advantage.