War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0576 MO., ARK., KANS., IND.T., AND DEPT. N.W. Chapter XXV.

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those you send to-morrow, I understand, are perfectly raw. I shall go myself in command.

JAS. TOTTEN,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 16, 1862.

Brigadier-General BROWN,

Springfield, Mo.:

Ask General Blunt to push forward to Clinton and open communication with General Totten at Sedalia. The enemy, several thousand strong, are now threatening Sedalia and Lexington. I am concentrating all my available force at those points, but will require all the assistance he can give me.

Tell Colonel Wright to keep within supporting distance of General Blunt.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 16, 1862.

General BROWN,

Springfield:

Withdraw your troops, if any, west and southwest of Springfield, and send Colonel Wright's force, as strong as you can make it, north, to co-operate with General Totten's troops. Send the accompanying dispatch to General Blunt, and order Colonel Wright to co-operate with him. Let the southwestern counties take care of themselves for the present. Hold Springfield, and operate north as much as possible.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

SPRINGFIELD, August 16, 1862.

Brigadier General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD,

Saint Louis:

A messenger returned from Fort Scott, bringing dispatches from General Blunt. He moved on Wednesday night toward Montevallo in strong force; asks for a strong co-operation from the north. The command of four pieces of artillery and 1,400 cavalry, under command of Colonel Clark Wright, is at Greenfield. Coffee' forces will not stand the attack of General Blunt, but will scatter if hard pressed, and will concentrate at an agreed point. I send expresses to Bolivar, where there are 300 armed militia; to Greenfield and to Mount Vernon, where there are 100 Second Wisconsin Cavalry and two companies militia, to co-operate with General Blunt.

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 17, 1862.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Rains and Coffee, with about 4,000 men, have succeeded in getting north to the Osage. General Blunt and a part of General Brown's troops are moving north in their rear. I am concentrating upon them