War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0533 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

this post on duty, and the four companies of McClurg's regiment which I have ordered here will no more than supply their place until their return.

JAS. TOTTEN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 4, 1862.

Brigadier-General TOTTEN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

I do not expect you to send more men from Jefferson City, but you have several regiments in your division. My question had a much broader and more important meaning than you gave it. The enemy is concentrating in large force in Northern Missouri. If by the use of local militia you can send more force do so. Can't the new militia take care of California?

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 4, 1862.

Brigadier-General TOTTEN, Jefferson City:

Concentrate your forces at important points and in bodies sufficient to secure them against defeat and in condition to act wherever they may be required. I believe Porter and Poindexter will cross the river if they get a chance.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 4, 1862.

Brigadier-General TOTTEN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

Do not let any boat pass up. Poindexter and Porter are aiming to cross the river. Keep the boat at Jefferson City. You must raise as much force as possible to help crush the rebels before they get a chance to cross. Your division is safe so long as they are on the other side of the river. There is no danger from the southwest.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 4, 1862.

Brigadier-General LOAN, Saint Joseph, Mo.:

Muskets and ammunition left Hudson to-day.

I am glad to learn the northwest is all right. Throw as much of your force into Northeast Missouri as possible at once, and all will be right there. Poindexter is probably between Hudson and Glasgow. Strike him at once, if possible. He is trying to get across the river.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

QUINCY, ILL., August 4, 1862.

Mr. PRESIDENT: Northern Missouri is again in revolt. The condition of affairs there is quite as bad as at any former time. For some