War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0524 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N. W. Chapter XXV.

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SPRINGFIELD, July 30, 1862.

Brigadier General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD, Saint Louis:

The following just received from General E. B. Brown:

HARTVILLE, July 29, 1862.

Our troops attacked Coleman twice and whipped him badly both times. McBride's force has fallen back. I shall return to Springfield with most of my command, leaving troops enough to hold this post and Vera Cruz and organize the militia.

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General.

JAS. H. STEGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, July 31, 1862.

Major-General CURTIS, Helena, Ark.:

As I have no control of the gunboats, and as their officers have decided that they cannot operate in the Arkansas or White Rivers, you must move without them. A quick and decisive movement on your part seems of the greatest importance in order to check the enemy's operations in Southern Missouri.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General, Commanding.

SPRINGFIELD, July 31, 1862.

Brigadier General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD, Saint Louis:

Colonel Hall, commanding at Cassville, telegraphs that it is reported the enemy, 2,000 strong, encamped at Bridgeville last night, and that he was 25 miles from Cassville. I have ordered him to destroy his stores and fall back toward this post if the report should prove true. Colonel Hall has sent out to learn the facts. Colonel King, at Newtonia, has been ordered to move to Cassville, but in case the report proves true he will join me here, or if he cannot do this fall back toward Greenfield.

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST,

Helena, Ark., July 31, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 19th, written on your arrival at Saint Louis, is the most refreshing news I have received from you for a long time. I congratulate you on what may be advantageous to the Government and yourself-your advance to the head of the Army; but I fear it may not be so well for the West. I hope, however, your health and diligence will enable you to fill the hopes of the country and secure the destruction of this accursed rebellion.

I have intercepted another package of rebel letters; the writers are at Chattanooga; they went from Corinth through Georgia and Alabama; they estimate their forces on the 15th instant at from 25,000 to