War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0481 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.- UNION.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FIRST INDIAN BRIGADE, No. 1.

Camp Corwin, on the Verdigris, July 19, 1862.

I. In consequence of the retreat of all white troops from the command of the Indian Expedition I hereby assume command of the Indian regiments in the field.

II. The commanders of the First, Second, and Third Indian Regiments will be present at these headquarters at precisely 8 o'clock p.m. for council of war.

By order of Colonel R. W. Furnas commanding First Indian Brigade.

A. C. ELLITHORPE,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPRINGFIELD, July 20, 1862.

Brigadier General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD:

I have information that the enemy are occupying the country in force from the head of Big Piney, in Lick Settlement, on line to Silver Creek, Arkansas, stationed as follows: Big Piney, Lick Settlement, 40 miles from Rolla, 600 men, under a man by the name of Scow [?]; at North Fork, 800 men, under Coleman; First, at Salem, with 1,000 men; McBride, at Silver Creek, with 2,100 men; Fraser, at Thomasville, with 600 men. The enemy report that they will take the aggressive soon in Missouri. This information in relation to the forces and position of the enemy is derived from several sources and is worthy of attention.

I shall make movements immediately to meet them.

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., July 20, 1862.

General BROWN, Springfield:

It is apparently the intention of the enemy to strike Lebanon or Rolla. If so, I should need nearly your entire force to hold him in check. Should the telegraphic line be broken so that I cannot communicate with you watch his movement, and if he advance move upon his flanks.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS, Warsaw, Mo., July 20, 1862.

Brigadier General JAMES TOTTEN,

Commanding Division Central Missouri, Jefferson City, Mo.:

GENERAL: Everything at and in the immediate vicinity of this post is at present quiet. Frequent scouting parties sent out during the past ten days fail to find or hear of any organized bands of rebels or guerrillas within a circuit of 15 or 20 mils,though there are still a number of bushwhackers scattered through different parts of the surrounding country.

I have succeeded in capturing 6,who are now in close confinement and cases being investigated. The troops shall be kept actively employed and no effort spared to exterminate or capture these outlaws.

Learning that the Sulphur Springs Ford, some 10 miles up the Osage, was a favorite crossing place for both guerrillas and rebels going both

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