War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0473 Chapter XXV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.- UNION.

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CHAPEL SPRINGS (2 1/2 MILES SOUTH OF TAHLEQUAH), July 15, 1862.

WILLIAM WEER, Colonel, Commanding Indian Expedition:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report:

I reached Tahlequah with my command yesterday evening at about 5 o'clock; met with no resistance, there being no forces in or about the town. I allowed my men to rest for a short time,and with Dr. Gillpatrick proceeded to gain all the information we could from the few people left in Tahlequah. Could hear of no forces in the country, except a company of 200 or 300 Indians camped near Park Hill, supposed to be friendly. We marched with the command 2 1/2 miles south toward Park Hill, and it getting dark and finding a fine camping ground we stopped for the night. This morning early I sent some 3 or 4 Indians with Dr. Gillpatrick (Ross') for the purpose of ascertaining the character of those Indians at Park Hill. They have not returned. I shall move as soon as I get word from them.

I remain, colonel with due consideration, your obedient servant,

H. S. GREENO,

Captain, Commanding Detachment.

PARK HILL, July 15, 1862.

WILLIAM WEER, Colonel, Commanding Indian Expedition:

SIR: I reached this place with my command this morning. I found about 200 Cherokee Indians here, who had formerly belonged to Drew's regiment. I also found Lieutenant-Colonel Ross and Major Pegg,of the rebel army. I thought, under the circumstances, it advisable to arrest them,and did so. They had both received orders from Colonel Cooper a few hours previous to report to Fort Davis for duty. The loyal people in this neighborhood are very badly frightened, owing to the fact of there being bushwhackers in every direction, and Chief John Ross feels very badly on account of our not having any forces on this side of the river for protection. He is entirely at their mercy,and thinks the rebels will pounce upon him as soon as I leave. There is no regular force between this place and Fort Smith. Colonel Rector passed within 15 miles of here yesterday, en route for Fort Gibson, with 500 men. General Rains is still above and east of us. I can learn nothing reliable as to this strength. There will be or is now being made a direct movement on the part of our enemy to concentrate all the available at Fort Davis and make a stand.

Last night Ross received a dispatch from Colonel Cooper, calling on him in the name of President Davis, Confederate States of America, to issue a proclamation calling on all Cherokee Indians over 18 and under 35 to come forward and assist in protecting the country from invasion. The proclamation was demanded of Ross. My coming here at the time I did not a stop to aid and givers Ross and excuse for not complying with the demand. According to the treaty made between the Cherokees and Southern Confederacy Ross was bound to furnish men when called on to do so by President Davis.

I shall scout the country well in this vicinity to-day and gain all the information I can and return to-morrow.

I remain, colonel, with due consideration, your obedient servant,

H. S. GREENO,

Captain, Commanding Detachment.