War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0373 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION. Chapter XXV.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Saint Louis, May 8, 1862.

Colonel J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Monterey, Tenn.:

On the 5th instant General Curtis sent a scout through to Memphis to ascertain the possibility of approaching the Mississippi by that direct route. Country said to be flooded. He will try to carry out your design. Union sentiment and the people of Arkansas more ready to abandon the rebel cause than some others he has had to contend with. They seen cheered by the arrival of their time-honored flag. Lieutenant Colonel Douglas McBride, chief of General McBride's staff and aide-de-camp of General Frost at the battle of Pea Ridge, was killed by our skirmishers on the 4th instant.

W. SCOTT KETCHUM,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST,

Camp at Batesville, Ark., May 9, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Commanding Department of the Mississippi, Monterey, Tenn.:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of the 6th is received. Ten infantry regiments, under Generals Asboth and Davis, will move immediately by forced marches to Cape Girardeau, which is the speediest route. It is over 200 miles.

My advance will be at Searcy to-night. I am checking supplies and rebel re-enforcement going Beauregard. The enemy tries to check my progress toward Little Rock, destroying ferries and felling trees; but the bands decrease and the people of Arkansas are disposed to yield. A provisioned government is desired, and as soon as we can occupy and hold Little Rock some arrangements should be made to established the civil power.

Deserters and citizens are crowing it to surrender and give ample assurance of future obedience to law.

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Saint Louis, May 9, 1862.

Colonel J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Monterey, Tenn.:

General Curtis reports he can only go 40 miles east of Jacksonport, the country being an endless lake, and that the whole country about the mouth of the Arkansas and White Rivers is flooded. He is making preparations to drive. Texas troops away and take Little Rock Hiss supply trains are still behind, and if boats cannot be had his train force will have to fall back for supplies. The people are crowing in to take the oath of allegiance.

W. SCOTT KETCHUM,

Brigadier-General.