War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0349 Chapter XXV. EXPEDITION FROM HELENA, ARK., ETC.

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NOVEMBER 5-8, 1862.- Expedition from Helena to Moro, Ark., and skirmishes (8th) at Marianna and La Grange.

REPORTS.

Numbers 1.- Colonel William Vandever, Ninth Iowa Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, Second Division, Army of the Southwest.

Numbers 2.- Captain Marland L. Perkins, Ninth Illinois Cavalry, of skirmishers at Marianna and La Grange, Ark.

Numbers 3.- Captain John H. Peters, Fourth Iowa Cavalry, of skirmishers at Marianna and La Grange, Ark.

Numbers 1. Report of Colonel William Vandever, Ninth Iowa Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, Second Division, Army of the Southwest.

HDQRS. 2nd Brigadier, 2nd DIV., ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST,

November 9, 1862.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your order, I left camp on the morning of the 5th instant, in command of the following detachments of cavalry: First Indiana, First Missouri, Ninth Illinois, Fifth Kansas, Second Wisconsin, and the Third and Fourth Iowa; in all 1,200 men, with four small guns and two small howitzers. In the vicinity of Trenton, on Big Creek, we came upon a small force of the enemy, which fled. We however captured 1 and wounded 1. I encamped that night at Trenton.

The next day I resumed the march by the Clarendon road, and in the course of the day surprised a party of about 100 of the enemy. The First Indiana, under Captain Walker, being in advance, charged the enemy and captured a number of prisoners. The enemy dispersed in the woods and eluded pursuit. At night I encamped on the Clarendon road with 20 miles of Clarendon.

On the morning of the 7th I resumed the march and left the main road, striking to the right, in the direction of Cotton Plant. through the inefficiency of the guides I spent the whole day in traveling unfrequented roads, and toward night found myself near Big Creek, some 6 or 7 miles from Moro. I directed my march to that place and encamped. During the day I captured several prisoners, and learned from them and other sources the enemy was apprised of our approach and largely superior in numbers and artillery. My stock of provisions being now nearly consumed, I determined to retrace my way to camp.

On the morning of the 8th I formed my command in two columns, one composed of detachments of the Ninth Illinois and Third and Fourth Iowa. I placed under command of Captain Perkins, of the Ninth Illinois, 560 men and two howitzers, and directed it to proceed to Marianna, and thence by the Saint Francis road to camp. With the remaining column I proceed by the Spring Creek road on my return. During the day I encountered small parties of the enemy, but without casualty or loss, and at evening arrived in camp. Captain Perkins, on the other road, encountered the enemy in considerable force and repulsed him with great loss, for the particulars of which I refer you to his report.

Captain Perkins reports 7 of the enemy killed, which his men found on the road. In addition to this I have information of at least 10 killed being carried off and a great number of wounded, making their loss in