War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0325 Chapter XXV. ACTION AT OLD FORT WAYNE, ETC.

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enter the Indian Territory, and restore the refugee Indians to their homes.

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

Major-General HALLECK.

Numbers 2. Reports of Brigadier General James G. Blunt, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, Army of the Frontier.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

FORT WAYNE, NEAR MAYSVILLE, ARK.,

October 22, 1862-2 p. m.

After a severe night march of 30 miles I attacked the rebel forces of Cooper and Stand Watie this morning at 7 o'clock. Their force estimated at from 4,000 to 7,000. The attack was made by my advance, consisting of the Second Kansas Volunteers and two mountain howitzers, and after a spirited engagement of less than an hour resulted in the complete and total rout of the enemy, with the loss of all their artillery, one battery 6-pounder brass pieces, a large number of horses, and a portion of their transportation and camp and garrison equipage. They are now fleeing in disorder int he direction of Fort Smith. All my available cavalry and four mountain howitzers are in hot pursuit.

My loss, as far as known, is 4 killed and about 15 wounded. The enemy's loss in killed and wounded is much greater. I have 30 prisoners.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. G. BLUNT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD,

Commanding Army of the Frontier.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

OLD FORT WAYNE, NEAR MAYSVILLE, ARK.,

October 28, 1862.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that, in pursuance of your instructions of the 20th instant, I left camp at Pea Ridge about 7 p. m. of that day with the Second and Third Brigades of my command, consisting of the Second, Sixth, Tenth, and Eleventh Kansas and the First and Third Cherokee Regiments, the First Kansas and the Second Indiana Batteries, and four mountain howitzers, leaving the First Brigade (General Salomon) to protect my rear and flank and my supply train.

Meeting the command of General Herron about midnight, which caused considerable delay, I did not reach Bentonville until near daylight of the 21st. At this latter place I halted until 5 p. m., at which hour my train (left behind at Pea Ridge) came up.

Having learned from my scouts (sent out during the day) that Cooper and Stand Watie were at or near Maysville with a force variously estimated at from 5,000 to 7,000 men, I determined, if possible, to reach