War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0171 Chapter XXV. SKIRMISH AT GREENVILLE, MO.

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Leeper's brother came in from Black River and reported that Deas and Reeves, or a part of their bands, had been and took some horses from him. They belonged to the same party that attacked the camp next morning. There had been guards on the east side of the camp, but were withdrawn after Major Lazear left. I know of no other cause for the guard being withdrawn than the confidence of the commanding officer that he could whip 500 men. I think that if the camp had been guarded as it should have been, and as there were men sufficient to have guarded it, that we could not have been surprised and could have whipped the rebels. The attack came from the southeast side of the camp. If a guard had been where it usually was I do not think a body of men could have passed them without being seen. There were over 100 men in camp at that time, but I cannot remember exactly the number reported.

E. FRANCIS,

First Lieutenant Company B, Twelfth Regiment Cav., Mo. S. M.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of September, 1862.

B. F. LAZEAR,

Major Twelfth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia.

Numbers 6. Affidavit of Serg. J. M. L. Jamieson, Twelfth Missouri Cavalry (Militia).

NEAR PATTERSON, MO., September 9, 1862.

Sergt. James M. L. Jamieson, of lawful age, being sworn, says:

I reside in Saint Francis County, Missouri. Am now first Sergeant of Company B, Twelfth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, commanded by Captain William T. Leeper. I was in camp near Greenville, Mo., on the morning of July 20, at the time the attack was made on said camp. I was in camp all the night before. On the night before the attack there were 3 pickets between the camp and town at the spring, and 3 on the Fredericktown road, up the river from the camp. The first 3 were on the river below the camp, and 3 camp guards and 1 corporal. This was all the guards that I have any knowledge of being out that night. These were the only guards we had out after Major Lazear left the camp, or at least there were no others out that night or the night before. I think Major Lazear left the camp some time between July 10 and 20. Some few days before the camp was attacked Captain Leeper said to me that we would have to keep a sharp lookout, for that we would be attacked, for they knew our strength, and that would be the place they would attack. I don't think a proper guard was kept at that point. There were at that time considerably over 100 men in camp.

J. M. L. JAMIESON,

First Sergt. Company B, Twelfth Regiment Cavalry, Mo. S. m.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of September, 1862.

B. F. LAZEAR,

Major Twelfth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia.