War of the Rebellion: Serial 019 Page 0139 Chapter XXV. SCOUT FROM WAYNESVILLE, MO., ETC.

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of 18 rebels and gave battle, killing 7 and several horses, our men coming out without a scratch. The remainder of the rebels made their escape across the river.

The expedition was not a little hazardous, but our men acquitted themselves nobly, and merited and received the commendation of General Steele for their coolness and bravery.

The division encamped, waiting for the pioneers to cut a road through the blockade, and on the 7th Matthew D. Williams, of Company C, and most estimable young man, while washing the river, was shot through the head by a guerrilla concealed in the swamp on the opposite side.

He was buried in camp with appropriate ceremonies.

With great respect, I remain, your obedient servant,

H. D. B. CUTLER,

Adjutant.

Adjutant-General BAKER.

JULY 6-8, 1862.-Scout from Waynesville to the Big Piney, Mo.

Report of Lieutenant Colonel Joseph A. Eppstein, Thirteenth Missouri Cavalry (Militia).

HDQRS. THIRTEENTH CAVALRY MO. STATE MILITIA,

Waynesville, Mo., July 9, 1862.

COLONEL: In pursuance of Special Orders, Numbers 12, from these headquarters, dated Waynesville, July 6, 1862, I started with 30 men of Companies B and F, under Lieutenants Ellington and Brown, to Wayman's Mill, on Spring Creek, 12 miles from here, where I was informed that a company of Coleman's men were encamped, about 20 miles from that place on the Big Piney. I immediately left in that direction, and on my way learned that Coleman had taken possession of Houston the day before and was running north toward the Springfield road, a statement which I disbelieved. Reports of the whereabouts and strength (from 100 to 400) of the company above mentioned was so contradictory, that I did not know how to operate until I came to Johnston's Mill, about 30 miles from this place, on the Big Piney, where I succeeded in arresting one of Coleman's men, who told me that he had left camp an hour previous and was on his way home. His farther, who is also a rebel and belongs to the same gang, lives about 10 miles farther on. I compelled him by threats to go with me as guide to the camp, which I certainly could not have found without his assistance.

I started from Johnston's Mill at sundown on the 7th instant, and at 8.30 p. m. arrived at another mill, where I ordered my men to dismount, leaving the horses in charge of 10 men as guards. From that lace I marched with the balance of my force (20 men, with officers) about a quarter of a mile up the road, thence through a dry creek, following the same for about 300 yards. Half an hour was lost in trying to ascertain the exact whereabouts of the camp, until I suddenly was hailed to halt. I made no reply to their sentinel, but pushed slowly forward until I found myself obstructed by a deep, stagnant creek, which could not be forded. I ordered my men to follow me around until I came to a shallower place; we crossed. On climbing up the rock on the other side we found the enemy alarmed and formed in line 12 yards in front of us. I ordered them to surrender, but was greeted by several volleys of musketry. It was only then that my men commenced firing, having pre-