War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0912 Chapter XXIV. OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD.

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bulances. I am gratified to see you had anticipated me respecting the wounded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. J. JACKSON,

Major-General.

NEAR MOUNT MERIDIAN, June 13, 1862.

[Lieutenant Colonel T. T. MUNFORD,

Commanding Detachment Second Virginia Cavalry:]

COLONEL: Your second dispatch of yesterday has been received, and I congratulate you upon your success. Can you sen done of the paroled Yankee doctors to attend to the wounded near the battle-field until Dr. McGuire can make some arrangement respecting them? Please send the captured horses to my camp, near Mount Crawford, to-day, and generally send all captures to the rear at the earliest practicable moment.

I wish you would send a scout in the direction of Conrad's Store, and let it visit Keezlertown and McGaheysville. It may not be necessary to go farther than McGaheysville. It is reported that the enemy is still in that direction.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. J. JACKSON,

Major-General.

NEAR MOUNT MERIDIAN, June 13, 1862.

[Colonel T. T. MUNFORD]:

COLONEL: It is important to cut off all communications between us and the enemy. Please require the ambulances to go beyond our lines at once and press our lines forward as far as practicable. It is very desirable that we should have New Market and that no information should pass to the enemy.

I expect soon to let you have two companies of cavalry from the Army of the Northwest.

I will not be able to leave here to-day, and probably not for some time, so you must look out for the safety of your train. Please impress the bearers of the flag of truce as much as possible with an idea of a heavy advance on our part, and let them return under such impression. Whilst it is desirable for us to have New Market, yet you must judge of the practicability. The only true rule for cavalry is to follow as long as the enemy retreats; beyond that of course you can, under present circumstances, do little or nothing, but every mile that you advance will probably give you additional prisoners, and especially so as far as New Market, where you will get command of the roads from Keezeltown and Columbia Bridge. I congratulate you upon your continued success.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. J. JACKSON,

Major-General.

Press our lines as far as you otherwise would have done before the flag of truce is permitted to pass them.

T. J. J.