War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0909 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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instruct him that as soon as he reaches Mechums River Depot he shall telegraph to General John H. winder, Richmond, Va., stating the number of these prisoners and the route he will travel, and asking General Winder to provide the necessary rations and a guard to relieve yours and take the prisoners on to Salisbury. Your detachments, as soon as relieved, will then return and report to you for duty. This telegram to General John H. Winder should be repeated again and again till it is answered, but meantime the detachment of prisoners should be kept moving as fast as possible until General Winder sends to take charge of them. The commander of the detachment is hereby empowered to purchase rations, if necessary, for the prisoners and guard on Government account, but you will instruct him to call at once on Captain Countz, issuing commissary for this division, for so much as is immediately necessary. The commanding officer should also be instructed to use all care to prevent the escape of prisoners, and to this end shall see that his guard is adequately supplied with fire-arms and ammunition before it sets out.

By order of Major-General Jackson;

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. L. DABNEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CIRCULAR.] HDQRS. ARMY OF THE VALLEY DISTRICT,

June 10, 1862.

Brigade commanders will ascertain at once if all the dead of their respective commands have been buried, and, if not, they will have a detail sufficient for the purpose, with picks and spades, to report at Mr. Lewis' furnace, about half a mile above these headquarters, at 3.30 p. m. to-day.

By order of General Jackson:

A. SMEAD,

Inspector-General.

[Indorsement.]

The above is a copy of an order just received, and must be promptly obeyed.

By order of General Ewell:

JAS. BARBOUR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS VALLEY DISTRICT,

June 11, 1862.

The major-general commanding directs that after the men cook one day's rations the trains all pass over the mountain to the foot, and in the first convenient position be parked, facing the road, so as they can move either way. If the rations are not on hand,m then the trains will move, avoiding a jam or collision, the troops to remain in their present position until further orders.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. L. JACKSON,

Aide-de-Camp.