War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0881 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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has been ordered to report to you at Gordonsville. One regiment, Colonel Lane's, has already been sent to that point, and is to be prepared for service there. Another will go forward at once and the rest as fast as they arrive.

I desire that these troops shall not be drawn to Swift Run Gap unless your necessities require it, the object being to form a strong column for the purpose of moving beyond the Rappahannock to cut off the enemy's communication between Winchester and Alexandria. I desire that you will cause the troops to be put in readiness to move, and when you get an opportunity make the demonstration.

I have carefully read the report of Lieutenant-Colonel Munford, and also your letter to General Johnston, and will send the latter by courier.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

STAUNTON, May 5, 1862-9.20 p. m.

Major General R. S. EWELL:

GENERAL: I understand from various sources that the enemy has left Harrisonburg.

Captain Winfield, of the cavalry, has gone in that direction, and I sent him word to try and communicate to you any information he may receive. If the enemy has advanced in the direction of the Warm Springs it must be for the purpose of effecting a junction with Milroy, and if you can do anything to call him back I hope that you will do so.

Very truly, yours,

T. J. JACKSON.

FROM RICHMOND,

(Received at Gordonsville May 6, 1862.)

General R. S. EWELL, Care Major Boyle:

If enemy have withdrawn from Harrisonburg I see no necessity for your division at Swift Run Gap. Object may be concentration at Fredericksburg. Try and ascertain. Can you cut off party at Culpeper Court-House?

R. E. LEE,

General.

STAUNTON, May 6, 1862.

Major General R. S. EWELL:

MY DEAR GENERAL: A woman who came to Harrisonburg with the Federals reports that the enemy, it was said, had orders to fall back to Strasburg. Should they move back there I hope that you will follow as far as may be consistent with your safety, so that they may know that their movements are being watched. I expect to move at least part of my command this evening upon the mission of which I named before leaving you.

Very truly, yours,

T. J. JACKSON.

P. S.-Should you follow the enemy and have to fall back before I join you, circumstances may render it desirable for you to cross the

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