War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0858 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS VALLEY DISTRICT,

Harrisonburg, Va., April 18, 1862.

(Received April 19, 1 p. m.)

Major General R. S. EWELL,

Commanding Potomac District:

GENERAL: Circumstances have so changed since Mr. Boswell left that I will be prevented from joining you at Fisher's Gap.* You will therefore come on the direct road to this point via Stanardsville.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. J. JACKSON.

P. S.-Please acknowledge the receipt of this, and direct Mr. Boswell to rejoin me and let Mr. Meade by your guide.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION,

April 20, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector-General:

SIR: I forwarded a letter by Mr. Turner, in which I spoke of the feasibility of attacking the enemy in my front. I was telegraphed by Mr. Turner that I was under General Johnston's orders, and that I knew his views.

I received on the 17th, at night, a letter from General J. [Johnson] authorizing the attack. It was then too late, as I had received orders from General Jackson to join him, and the river being past fording I had not time. The movement would not have been made under the circumstances, and I merely write to call attention to one singular part of this affair. General Lee told Mr. Turner that General Johnston had conversed with me by telegraph. The only one I received on the subject from any one was the above from Mr. Turner. High water and General Jackson's movements prevented anything being done by me, and I merely write on the subject, as there seems a possibility of want of faith by some of the telegraph operators.

Respectfully,

R. S. EWELL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, April 21, 1862.

General R. S. EWELL,

Commanding Third Division;

GENERAL: Your letter of the 20th has been received. When I wrote to you in reference to your proposition to advance against the enemy in your front I was under the impression that General Johnston had communicated with you by telegraph. It seems it was by letter, and I therefore see no reason for doubting the fidelity of the telegraph line, which you think may be involved. I am ignorant of the strength of the enemy east of the Rappahannock in your late front. General Field has

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*See Jackson to Ewell, same date, p. 854.

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