War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0843 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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The enemy has not advanced to-day, but it appears to me that soon he will do so or else fall back, as the country around him is very much drained of forage, and her cannot get much short of 40 miles wagoning unless he advances. It would not be prudent to attack him in his present position, but if you can send me 5,000 infantry, 400 rounds of chests filled, I will make a stand, and if circumstances justify it I will practicable, but I am not sanguine of being able to draw him this side of Mount Jackson, and with the force I have named it would not do to attack him unless he comes this side of the town, unless his strength is much less than it is represented by a scout who returned this evening; he put it at not less than 17,000. I am of the opinion that he has overestimated.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. J. JACKSON,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS VALLEY DISTRICT,

New Mount Jackson, April 5, 1862-9.10 a. m.

Major General JAMES LONGSTREET,

Commanding Department of Northern Virginia:

MY DEAR GENERAL: Your dispatch of 12 m. yesterday is at hand, * and I am much obliged for the Parrott ammunition.

All is quiet in front, but it appears to me that Banks will either advance or fall back before many days, as forage around him is scarce. Should he advance, I believe it will not for the present be for more than a few miles, so that he will be able to supply his army more easily. He is very cautious. As he belongs to McClellan's army I suppose that McClellan is at the helm, and that he would not, even if Banks so desired, permit him to advance much farther until other parts of his army are farther advanced. A deep creek (Stone Cree) separates Banks' command from mine. He should not be attacked in his present position if an advance is made on him; his position should be turned, and then attacked in front from this side as he falls back. If you can let me have a man who understands Alexander's system of signals I hope your will do so, in order that he may instruct others for me.

Very truly, yours,

T. J. JACKSON.

HEADQUARTERS VALLEY DISTRICT,

Near Mount Jackson, April 5, 1862-11.50 p. m.

Major General JAMES LONGSTREET,

Commanding Department of Northern Virginia:

MY DEAR GENERAL: Your dispatch of 11 a. m.* is at hand.

To-day one of my lieutenants has returned from Winchester and reports that there are about 400 troops there; that all the troops, with but slight exceptions, belonging to Banks' command have moved in this direction via the Strasburg route, and he believes they number 25,000, but that possibly the number may not exceed 22,000. This force is,

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*Not found.

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