War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0792 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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cars of ammunition are here, and I am endeavoring to ascertain if it will be taken away if sent forward. If the fight is moving up the river it does not seem proper to send ammunition to Fairfax Station. Can you give me any light?

H. HAUPT.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 1, 1862.

HERMAN HAUPT, Alexandria, Va.:

Fight supposed to be on Little River pike, near Chantilly, but do not know positively.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

ALEXANDRIA, VA., September 1, 1862.

Colonel HAUPT:

I have detained at Burke's the ammunition train sent this p.m. and will hold it there. McCrickett telegraphs that his forces are in line of battle and that Major Haller had buckled on his sword and gone to the field; also that firing was heard out to the right and quite near.

J. H. DEVEREUX.

SEPTEMBER 1, 1862.

J. H. DEVEREUX:

General Halleck thinks it best not to send forward trains to-night. Those sent can be held at Burke's. I do not apprehend any attack on Fairfax Station to-night, as it is fully covered by very large forces at Fairfax Court-House. Excepting a few empty cars for the wounded, you can withdraw all cars and engines to a safe distance in the rear. Please communicate this information to Major Haller and to McCrickett. We have no intelligence in addition to your own.

H. HAUPT.

FAIRFAX, VA., September 1, 1862.

General R. B. MARCY:

I have ridden to and beyond Fairfax Court-House this afternoon to inform myself of our positions and of the enemy, as I have no mounted orderlies to bring in reliable information. I found the right wing of the United States forces approaching Fairfax Court-House. General Hatch posted his brigade in the rifle pits near town, and General Couch's division was but a short distance in his front, toward Centreville. Other troops were going into positions around that place. I was informed the enemy was turning our right flank-Jackson's corps, consisting of 20,000. While there a cannonade was going on near the turnpike road, say 3 miles from Fairfax Court-House, and when at this camp we heard musketry firing very distinctly, which lasted some time. Results are not known. We are here comfortably safe.

Respectfully,

G. O. HALLER,

Major, Seventh Infantry.