War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0760 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, August 30, 1862.

Major-General BURNSIDE, Falmouth, Va.:

Send immediately the companies of Williams' cavalry now on transports to Alexandria.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, August 30, 1862.

Major-General BURNSIDE, Falmouth, Va.:

Suspend the movement of your troops, except Williams' cavalry. The transports will remain at Aquia till to-morrow morning. Pope's successes will probably render your presence here unnecessary. He has fought a great battle, and so far successfully.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

FALMOUTH, VA., August 30, 1862.

(Received 6 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-chief:

Your last dispatch indicates that we received orders to move from here, but we have received no orders to that effect, and will, as you direct, remain here. We are jubilant over the success of Pope, and hope to hear that he has completely routed the enemy. All is quiet in our front and at the upper fords, excepting the driving in of our pickets at Kelly's Ford I mentioned in my last dispatch. No particulars as yet have been received.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 30, 1862.

Major General E. D. KEYES,

Commanding Fourth Corps:

Directions were sent to the commanding officer at Yorktown to push forward Pleasonton's cavalry with all possible dispatch, and to let nothing interfere with it; that not a moment should be lost. The interference on the part of Couch's division has produced the most serious results. I am entirely without cavalry. The cavalry must be pushed forward at once, and nothing must interfere with it in the slightest degree.

I entirely approve of General Pleasonton's action in arresting Colonel Russell.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

YORKTOWN, August 30, 1862.

Colonel INGALLS,

Aide-de-Camp and Chief Quartermaster, Alexandria:

Had to stop embarking for want of transports. Last night it began to blow, and at present it is blowing too hard to embark horses at the