War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0751 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., August 30, 1862-9.40 p.m.

Major-General McCLELLAN, Alexandria:

By sending out Couch's men on the train you get them nearer the field of battle. New troops can follow and replace them. If we can get forces enough out to-morrow we shall be all right. The protection of the railroad is of vast importance to-night.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 30, 1862-10.10 p.m.

Major General D. N. COUCH, Commanding Division:

The commanding general, in obedience to the orders of the general-i-chief, directs that you throw forward your division to-night as fast as the railroad can provide transportation, as a guard to the road, which is considered by the general-in-chief as in danger from marauding parties of the enemy. Please confer with Colonel Haupt, the superintendent, as to the most exposed points.

The general wishes you to have your division disembarked at once, and to have such portion as cannot be thrown forward by the railroad bivouac outside of Alexandria near the railroad. The general-in-chief regards the protection of the road to-night as of vast importance. You will therefore please lose no time in throwing your troops forward as fast as they can be provided with transportation.

By command:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., August 30, 1862-10.10 p.m.

Major-General McCLELLAN, Alexandria:

All of Sumner's corps on the south side of the river not actually required in the forts should march to Pope's relief. Replace them with new regiments. Franklin should also be hurried on to re-enforce Pope.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

MANASSAS, VA., August 30, 1862-11 a.m.

General McCLELLAN, Alexandria, Va.:

There was a camp rumor as I came in from Bristoe that Jackson had moved toward Alexandria. Colonel J. S. Clark, one of my aides, who has been out to the front, reports that Jackson has fallen back about 5 miles toward the mountains. He judges mainly by the sound of the guns. There has been an entire change of position, I judge. A scout reported to me at 10 a.m. that Jackson was at Gainesville with about 30,000. He said he saw and knew him. My corps is moving up from Bristoe. No enemy near.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General.