War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0735 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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had better retire. No infantry in sight, and I am continuing the movement. Stay where you are, to aid me, if necessary.

MORELL.

General MORELL:

I have all within reach of you. I wish you to give the enemy a good shelling without wasting ammunition, and push at the same time a party over to see what is going on. We cannot retire while McDowell holds his own.

F. J. P.

AUGUST 29, 1862.

[Received about dusk.]

General MORELL:

Put your men in position to remain during the night, and have out your pickets. Put them so that they will be in line, and on rising will be in position to resist any attack. I am about a mile from you. McDowell says all goes well, and we are getting the best of the fight. I wish you would send me a dozen men form that cavalry.

F. J. PORTER,

Major-General.

Keep me informed. Troops are passing up to Gainesville, pushing the enemy. Rickett's has gone; also King.

[Received about sunset August 29, 1862.]

General MORELL:

I wish you to push up two regiments, supported by two others, preceded by skirmishers, the regiments at intervals of 200 yards, and attack the party with a section of a battery opposed to you. The battle works well on our right, and the enemy are said to be retiring up the pike. Give the enemy a good shelling when our troops advance.

F. J. PORTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Received a few minutes before daylight August 30.]

General MORELL:

Lose not a moment in withdrawing and coming down the road to me. The wagons which went up send down at once and have the road cleared, and send me work when you have all in motion. Your command must follow Sykes'.

F. J. PORTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Received daylight August 30, 1862.]

General STURGIS:

Please put your command in motion to follow Sykes as soon as he