War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0732 OPERATIONS IN V. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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and Huger relieved form command; Johnston still off duty, and Beauregard supposed to be crazy.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

FALMOUTH, VA., August 29, 1862 - 1 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief, and

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN, Alexandria:

The following is just received from advance pickets:

BARNETT'S FORD - 10 a. m.

I sent party out last night 4 miles on the railroad from Rappahannock toward Brandy Station. No force to be seen there. Captain McIntyre this morning picketed the road toward Morgansburg, with instructions to scout in that direction. Heavy firing this morning, apparently in the direction of Brentsville and being at this hour toward Warrenton. We will keep you informed.

THOS. C. DEVIN,

Colonel.

Your telegram just received.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

FALMOUTH, VA., August 29, 1862 - 1 p. m.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General:

The following message just received:

ADVANCE, 29th - 12.45 p. m.

General AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE:

Messenger that left Pope's army this morning about 6 o'clock reports our forces within 2 miles of Manassas Junction. He says when about 1 1/2 miles from our forces heavy cannonading - commenced by the rebels he thinks. He left railroad at Catlett's Station, coming direct here by short road. He was informed by a contraband that there were some 1,000 or 1,500 rebel cavalry between Warrenton and the Junction.

CHERRY,

Telegraph Operator.

A. E. BURNSIDE.

Please say to General Halleck or officially that the enemy is in some force 5 miles off.

A. E. B.

FALMOUTH, VA., August 29, 1862 - 1 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief, and

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN, Alexandria:

The following just received from Porter, 4 miles form Manassas, the 28th, 2 p.m.:

All that talk of bagging Jackson, &c., was bosh. That enormous Gap (Manassas) was left open and the enemy jumped through, and the store of McDowell having cut off Longstreet had no good foundation. The enemy have destroyed all our bridges, burned trains, &c., and made this army rush back to look after its line of communication and find our base of subsistence. We are far from alexandria, considering this moving of transportation. Your supply train of 40 wagons is here, but I can't find them. There is a report that Jackson is at Centreville, which you can believe or