War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0711 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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use of the guns. The Third Battalion New York Artillery, about 300 strong, was distributed as follows: Fort Barnard, one company; Richardson, one platoon; Scott, one platoon; Blenker, one platoon; Ward, one company; Worth, one platoon; Ellsworth, one platoon. At Fort Cass, one company Wisconsin artillery. All the above are old troops, exercised at the guns. Near Fort Corcoran are two regiments of new troops; at Fort Tillinghast, one new regiment; between Craig and Richardson, two new regiments; at Fort Barnard, one; between Ward and Blenker, one; near Fort Worth, one ; at Fort Lyon, one new regiment. You will observe, from what precedes, on the south of the Potomac there were left behind about 1,000 experienced troops. These have been distributed so as barely to afford a relief for each gun. New troops have been brought into position to be drilled at the guns and to guard the lines, but they are yet perfectly raw.

I think that Colonel Warren's Zouaves and some of the regulars would be thrown into the works, to give us reliefs of experienced gunners, and that some of the old troops should be distributed along the lines, if there is danger of an immediate attack.

On the north of the Potomac the One hundred and twelfth Pennsylvania (old) Regiment is distributed from Massachusetts to Lincoln. A new regiment occupies the works from Massachusetts to Franklin, near the Potomac, with another new regiment in reserve. There are two new regiments over the Eastern Branch. Where and what time can I meet you?

J. G. BARNARD,

Brigadier-General.

WASHINGTON, August 28, 1862 - 8.45 p. m.

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN:

GENERAL: I telegraphed you to-day that the lines of fortifications from Fort Richardson to Fort De Kalb and those of the Chain Bridge had scarcely enough experienced artillerymen to man the guns with one relief, and that all the other troops were raw, uninstructed, and unreliable.

The evening paper states that the enemy is in force at Gainesville and Manassas Junction. The security of the line of fortifications on the south of the Potomac requires 2,000 additional experienced artillerymen, and additional old troops to defend the intervals, according to circumstances, of which I am not fully the master, depending somewhat upon your own plans. If your force at Alexandria is not to advance immediately I think it should be distributed along the lines, and in any case that an old regiment should be added to the force of the Chain Bridge, and a few regiments distributed along the lines, to give confidence to our raw troops.

J. G. BARNARD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Defenses of Washington.

WASHINGTON, August 28, 1862.

General HALLECK, Commander-in-Chief:

GENERAL: The evening paper states that the enemy are in force at Gainesville and Manassas Junction, the latter point being about 30